Ratings, Privacy, & Branding

Blog Baskets-02.jpg

Broadcast C3 Ratings

Ad Age’s Anthony Crupi on the C3 ratings for Q1. In short, reach is down and prices are up. If you’re buying ads for broadcast TV, this matters to you, and we’d recommend keeping an eye on. We certainly will be.

https://adage.com/article/media/two-years-broadcast-c3-ratings-have-shrunk-24-percent/2167886

“According to Nielsen, broadcast C3 ratings in the first quarter fell 17 percent compared to the year-ago period, as ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox combined for an average primetime delivery of 6.26 million adults 18-49. That 4.9 currency rating is the lowest on record for the quarter and effectively means that fewer than 5 percent of the 128.9 million Americans in the key demo saw your ads while they watched network TV.”

“According to MoffettNathanson estimates, while the demos sank 17 percent in the first quarter, ad sales revenues at the big Four nets grew 3.5 percent to $4.1 billion.”


Social Media Privacy

eMarketer’s Blake Droesch on the public’s general response to social media privacy. Not to our surprise, people claim to be bothered, but overall people’s actions have changed very little. What’s privacy compared to a Facebook quiz or two?

https://www.emarketer.com/content/how-social-media-users-have-and-have-not-responded-to-privacy-concerns?ecid=NL1001

“The Facebook Cambridge Analytica revelations changed the way people in the US think about online privacy. And it should come as no surprise that many have grown wary over the mishandling of personal information.”

  • Internet users are clearing cookies and sharing less on social media

  • Ad blockers continue to gain popularity

  • The 'pay for privacy' concept hasn’t taken off

  • Nearly one-third of US internet users are still willing to sacrifice privacy for convenience

  • Overall, outlooks for user growth and time spent on social media are still healthy

Getting Brand Attention

Steve Bryant shares via Medium his insight into the process of using a brand to tell stories. As big believers in story, this article jumped out to us as perceptive and concise.

https://medium.com/article-group/there-are-only-two-ways-to-tell-your-story-2e72d0f50ce  

“The only way to get attention is to tell stories. Brands should know this well, for what is a brand but a story itself. There are only two ways to tell these stories: You can get others to tell your story, or you can tell your story yourself.”


For your listening pleasure, be sure to check out our latest episode of the Slate and Main podcast. We take a look at antitrust, Microsoft phones, and Google’s server failure, plus plenty more.

And of course, we our yearly video marketing guide is out! If you’ve like this basket, you’re going to love this. Download your copy now for free and starting browsing.

Jessica Nafe